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15 June 2015

Training course: Detecting animal diseases early

Participants of the training course attending one of the first seminars

Participants of the training course attending one of the first seminars

Seibersdorf, 15 June 2015. Trans-boundary animal diseases (TADs) can spread rapidly across national borders. Many factors such as animal movements, international trade of livestock and livestock products and the effects of climate change have contributed to a spread of TADs in Asia in recent years. Not only can TADs negatively impact a region’s economy, they can be highly contagious, as most can cause severe sicknesses in humans and are a concern to public health institutions. “It is therefore crucial to detect these diseases in an early stage in order to rapidly apply control measures,” explains Ivancho Naletoski, Technical Officer for Animal Health in the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture.

From mid-June, 23 participants from 13 Asian Member States are attending two-weeks training on the early detection of animal diseases in post-flood environments, with emphasis on water borne and vector borne diseases. Both theoretical classes and practical laboratory sessions with the Seibersdorf-based Animal Production and Health Laboratory will equip the participants with knowledge and experiences they can feed into their national surveillance and control programmes for flood-related diseases.

The regional representation of the training participants aims to create a network that diagnoses diseases at an early stage and rapidly disseminates information to national and international veterinary authorities.

For more information please visit Animal Production and Health and Topics in Focus: Animal Health and Production.

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