Animal Production and Health

Animal Production and Health

The Animal Production and Health Sub-programme contribute to the enhancement of global food security through the implementation of sustainable livestock production systems using nuclear and nuclear related techniques. We assist Member States to improve livestock productivity through the efficient use of locally available feed resources, adequate management practices and breeding programmes for indigenous and upgraded animals, and diagnostic tools and prophylactic measures for the control and prevention of animal and zoonotic diseases.

Support and guidance is provided in formulating and implementing activities that underpin Member States’ national, regional and global livestock development objectives in strategic, applied and adaptive research, technology transfer, capacity building, policy advice and information management.

Highlights
Strengthening Africa’s Regional Capacity for Diagnosis of Emerging and Re-emerging Zoonotic Diseases Strengthening Africa’s Regional Capacity for Diagnosis of Emerging and Re-emerging Zoonotic Diseases. A key issue in dealing with highly contagious infectious zoonotic diseases is the personal safety of medical and veterinary staff during processes where they may be exposed to dangerous pathogens. To facilitate dissemination of safety knowledge in this area, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division has generated two videos: the first is a general introduction to the topic itself; the second a step-by-step instruction guide to the correct use of personal protective equipment during field sampling. Read More & Watch Videos »
Differentiating Transboundary Animal Diseases in a Single Test Differentiating Transboundary Animal Diseases in a Single Test. The IAEA, in partnership with the FAO through the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, has developed a multi-pathogen assay at its Animal Production and Health Laboratory in Seibersdorf, Austria, that was validated in collaboration with veterinary laboratories from the VETLAB Network. The assay simultaneously detects the PPR virus and other pathogens causing similar signs of disease. Thanks to this innovative method, Member State scientists are now able to diagnose diseases more efficiently, both in terms of time and costs. Read More »
Scientific methods test farmers’ indigenous knowledge to identify sheep and goat breeds resistant to parasites Scientific methods test farmers’ indigenous knowledge to identify sheep and goat breeds resistant to parasites. In a scientific study, farmers in ten developing countries were asked to identify one sheep or goat breed that they considered to be naturally resistant and one naturally susceptible to parasitic infection. Subsequent scientific exploration included everything from examining eyes for anaemia to checking the 60 000 DNA markers of their genomes for variations that indicated resistance. Interestingly, the indigenous knowledge as to animal susceptibility and resistance was largely correct and is now being used to breed parasite-resistant sheep and goats. Read More »
FAO-AG Confers an Outstanding Teamwork Award to the Animal Genetic Resources Team FAO-AG Confers an Outstanding Teamwork Award to the Animal Genetic Resources Team. The Animal Genetic Resources Team receives Outstanding Teamwork Achievement Award from FAO’s Agriculture and Consumer Protection Department for its superior accomplishments in supporting the Global Plan of Action for Animal Genetic Resources and enhancing Member State capacities on characterization, conservation and sustainable improvement of locally-adapted livestock. The team is comprised of staff from the Joint FAO/IAEA Division’s Animal Production and Health Section and FAO’s Animal Production and Health Division. Read More »
IAEA Impact: Myanmar's Dairy Farmers Benefit from Cattle Breeding Programme Using Nuclear-based Techniques Myanmar's Dairy Farmers Benefit from Cattle Breeding Programme Using Nuclear-based Techniques. Genetic improvement of native cattle breeds through radio-immune assay and artificial insemination applications to increase milk production while retaining their adaptability to the local environment and tolerance to diseases, resulting in sustainable improvement of farmers livelihood in Myanmar. The IAEA and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) have jointly supported Myanmar’s Livestock Breeding and Veterinary Department in perfecting and rolling out appropriate technologies across the country.
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Mongolia Keeps Animal Diseases at Bay with the Help of Nuclear Technologies Mongolia Keeps Animal Diseases at Bay with the Help of Nuclear Technologies. A portrait of life in Mongolia is not complete without livestock. For city dwellers and nomads alike, more than 70 million animals are an essential source of food, income and cultural symbols for this country of barely three million inhabitants. Yet livestock owners like Batbaatar Chuluun are calm about highly contagious animal diseases. That’s thanks to Mongolia’s comprehensive animal disease control system built in part with support from the IAEA, in cooperation with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Read More »
Laboratory network that helped win rinderpest battle expands efforts to control other animal diseases Laboratory network that helped win rinderpest battle expands efforts to control other animal diseases. When avian influenza spread across Asia into Africa in the early 2000s, veterinary extension services were largely unprepared and unable to conduct the specific tests needed - a network to collaborate and share technical expertise was urgently needed. Several years later, compare that to the situation when an avian flu outbreak was suspected in Togo in 2015. Togo sent its suspicious samples to a dedicated laboratory in neighbouring Ghana and received the results without delay. This advance is the result of VETLAB, a network of veterinary diagnostic laboratories now established and functioning in both Africa and Asia. Read More »
IAEA Impact: How Nuclear Science Helps Botswana Control Animal Diseases, Ensure Food Safety and Maintain its Beef Exports IAEA Impact: How Nuclear Science Helps Botswana Control Animal Diseases, Ensure Food Safety and Maintain its Beef Exports. In Botswana, cattle is a way of life. Owning cattle and selling animals when money is tight provide the livelihood for much of the rural population and represent an important supplementary income for city dwellers. When in 2008 the European Union (EU) tightened sanitary requirements on beef imports, Botswana’s second largest export industry came to the verge of losing its most important and lucrative market. Since then, the use of nuclear and nuclear-derived techniques, introduced with support from the IAEA in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), has enabled the country to put in place veterinary and food safety surveillance systems that meet EU requirements. Read More »
Lab to Help Diagnosis of Animal Diseases Using Nuclear-Derived Techniques Opens in Botswana Lab to Help Diagnosis of Animal Diseases Using Nuclear-Derived Techniques Opens in Botswana. The IAEA, in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), has supported the country’s national veterinary laboratory since 2009, helping compliance with European Union testing and surveillance requirements. The IAEA, through several technical cooperation projects, has provided equipment, reagents, expert advice and training for laboratory staff. Read More »
IAEA assists Sudan in the control of animal diseases through the development of vaccines IAEA assists Sudan in the control of animal diseases through the development of vaccines. Control and eradication of animal diseases are crucial for food security and improving the livelihoods of farmers. With support from the Animal Production and Health Subprogramme of the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, the IAEA, in partnership with FAO, is assisting Sudan in developing an irradiated vaccine to protect livestock against one such zoonotic disease, Brucellosis. Read More »

Archived Highlights