Animal Production and Health

Animal Production and Health

The Animal Production and Health Sub-programme contribute to the enhancement of global food security through the implementation of sustainable livestock production systems using nuclear and nuclear related techniques. We assist Member States to improve livestock productivity through the efficient use of locally available feed resources, adequate management practices and breeding programmes for indigenous and upgraded animals, and diagnostic tools and prophylactic measures for the control and prevention of animal and zoonotic diseases.

Support and guidance is provided in formulating and implementing activities that underpin Member States’ national, regional and global livestock development objectives in strategic, applied and adaptive research, technology transfer, capacity building, policy advice and information management.

Highlights
The Joint FAO-IAEA Division is supporting Member States to combat H7N9 avian influenza - a new avian influenza virus concern for Humans. Avian Influenza, also known as “Avian Flu” or “Bird Flu” is caused by a virus that has a reservoir in wild birds. Usually, wild birds are resistant to the disease but do carry and secrete the virus, transmitting it to domesticated birds (chicken, duck, and turkey) that are susceptible and can become sick and die. Read More »
GLOBAL RINDERPEST ERADICATION: The IAEA contribution GLOBAL RINDERPEST ERADICATION: The IAEA contribution. Countries suffering from the ravages of rinderpest, a highly contagious viral disease of cattle, buffalo, yak and several wildlife species, were officially recognised as disease free by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) in May 2011 and FAO in June 2011 when they declared that rinderpest was eradicated world-wide. Read More »
Rinderpest Freedom Celebration, 20 September 2011, IAEA Headquarters, Vienna Rinderpest Freedom Celebration. Rinderpest, also known as cattle plague, is a highly contagious viral disease of cattle, buffalo, yak and several wildlife species, and has caused immense livestock losses throughout history. IAEA in collaboration with FAO, OIE and other partners supported its Member States for more than 25 years to control and eradicate the disease. Read More »
On the trail of avian influenza: using nuclear technology to support early warning and surveillance On the trail of avian influenza: using nuclear technology to support early warning and surveillance. Following the first occurrence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (AI) in the human population in 1997, the migratory pathways of wild birds have become a topic of growing interest. Using nuclear technology – specifically, stable isotopes analyses – it is possible to trace the origin of individual birds and to identify their migration patterns during a specific period. Read More »