Animal Production and Health

Animal Production and Health

The Animal Production and Health Sub-programme contribute to the enhancement of global food security through the implementation of sustainable livestock production systems using nuclear and nuclear related techniques. We assist Member States to improve livestock productivity through the efficient use of locally available feed resources, adequate management practices and breeding programmes for indigenous and upgraded animals, and diagnostic tools and prophylactic measures for the control and prevention of animal and zoonotic diseases.

Support and guidance is provided in formulating and implementing activities that underpin Member States’ national, regional and global livestock development objectives in strategic, applied and adaptive research, technology transfer, capacity building, policy advice and information management.

Highlights
Controlling Avian Flu in West Africa: Nuclear-Derived Techniques Enable Early Detection of Outbreaks Controlling Avian Flu in West Africa: Nuclear-Derived Techniques Enable Early Detection of Outbreaks. Following the recent outbreak of avian flu in Cote d’Ivoire, the IAEA – through its partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) – is helping West African countries in the early and accurate detection of the virus using nuclear-derived techniques. Read More »
Global Strategy to Fight Global Ruminant Pest Uses Nuclear Techniques Global Strategy to Fight Global Ruminant Pest Uses Nuclear Techniques. Under the Global Strategy, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the IAEA and their partners will work together to eliminate PPR, improving the livelihoods of people and economies in Africa, the Middle East and Asia that rely on sheep and goats, boosting food security in the process. Read More »
Building veterinary laboratory capacity in Africa: THE VETLAB NETWORK Building veterinary laboratory capacity in Africa: THE VETLAB NETWORK. Transboundary animal diseases and those that affect human health have a strong impact on community livelihoods, trade and public health. They also pose a major challenge to the value chain of food of animal origin, causing serious production losses and food safety concerns. Early and rapid diagnosis and control of these diseases require concerted interdisciplinary actions at national and international levels. The sub-Saharan African branch of the VETLAB NETWORK, composed of 32 African countries, aims at remedying this situation, with four leading institutes providing regional support. Read More [pdf] »
A tribute to the work of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division for the Control and Eradication of Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR) A tribute to the work of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division for the Control and Eradication of Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR). At the International Conference for the Control and Eradication of Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR) held in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, in April, Dr Adama Diallo, a staff member of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division, was elevated to the grade of Officer of the National Order of the Republic of Cote d’Ivoire. This award recognises his particular role in creating the PPR vaccine and, in a broader perspective, all the work that the Joint FAO/IAEA Division has undertaken in this area over many years. Read More »
Ethiopia awards IAEA for continuous support in veterinary disease diagnostics Ethiopia awards IAEA for continuous support in veterinary disease diagnostics. Since 2011, the IAEA, through the Joint FAO/IAEA Division, has increased its support to a network of veterinary laboratories (“VETLAB Network”) in sub-Saharan Africa through a project entitled “Strengthening Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories in Africa for Rapid and Specific Diagnosis of Transboundary Animal Diseases”. Read More »
The Joint FAO-IAEA Division is supporting Member States to combat H7N9 avian influenza - a new avian influenza virus concern for Humans. Avian Influenza, also known as “Avian Flu” or “Bird Flu” is caused by a virus that has a reservoir in wild birds. Usually, wild birds are resistant to the disease but do carry and secrete the virus, transmitting it to domesticated birds (chicken, duck, and turkey) that are susceptible and can become sick and die. Read More »

Archived Highlights