Animal Production and Health

Animal Production and Health

The Animal Production and Health Sub-programme contribute to the enhancement of global food security through the implementation of sustainable livestock production systems using nuclear and nuclear related techniques. We assist Member States to improve livestock productivity through the efficient use of locally available feed resources, adequate management practices and breeding programmes for indigenous and upgraded animals, and diagnostic tools and prophylactic measures for the control and prevention of animal and zoonotic diseases.

Support and guidance is provided in formulating and implementing activities that underpin Member States’ national, regional and global livestock development objectives in strategic, applied and adaptive research, technology transfer, capacity building, policy advice and information management.

Highlights
Laboratory network that helped win rinderpest battle expands efforts to control other animal diseases Laboratory network that helped win rinderpest battle expands efforts to control other animal diseases. When avian influenza spread across Asia into Africa in the early 2000s, veterinary extension services were largely unprepared and unable to conduct the specific tests needed - a network to collaborate and share technical expertise was urgently needed. Several years later, compare that to the situation when an avian flu outbreak was suspected in Togo in 2015. Togo sent its suspicious samples to a dedicated laboratory in neighbouring Ghana and received the results without delay. This advance is the result of VETLAB, a network of veterinary diagnostic laboratories now established and functioning in both Africa and Asia. Read More »
IAEA Impact: How Nuclear Science Helps Botswana Control Animal Diseases, Ensure Food Safety and Maintain its Beef Exports IAEA Impact: How Nuclear Science Helps Botswana Control Animal Diseases, Ensure Food Safety and Maintain its Beef Exports. In Botswana, cattle is a way of life. Owning cattle and selling animals when money is tight provide the livelihood for much of the rural population and represent an important supplementary income for city dwellers. When in 2008 the European Union (EU) tightened sanitary requirements on beef imports, Botswana’s second largest export industry came to the verge of losing its most important and lucrative market. Since then, the use of nuclear and nuclear-derived techniques, introduced with support from the IAEA in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), has enabled the country to put in place veterinary and food safety surveillance systems that meet EU requirements. Read More »
Lab to Help Diagnosis of Animal Diseases Using Nuclear-Derived Techniques Opens in Botswana Lab to Help Diagnosis of Animal Diseases Using Nuclear-Derived Techniques Opens in Botswana. The IAEA, in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), has supported the country’s national veterinary laboratory since 2009, helping compliance with European Union testing and surveillance requirements. The IAEA, through several technical cooperation projects, has provided equipment, reagents, expert advice and training for laboratory staff. Read More »
IAEA assists Sudan in the control of animal diseases through the development of vaccines IAEA assists Sudan in the control of animal diseases through the development of vaccines. Control and eradication of animal diseases are crucial for food security and improving the livelihoods of farmers. With support from the Animal Production and Health Subprogramme of the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, the IAEA, in partnership with FAO, is assisting Sudan in developing an irradiated vaccine to protect livestock against one such zoonotic disease, Brucellosis. Read More »
Joint FAO-IAEA research looks for a stable-isotope based method to quantify feed intake Joint FAO-IAEA research looks for a stable-isotope based method to quantify feed intake. Joint FAO/IAEA Division developed a research project on isotope based techniques for estimation of feed intake in grazing cattle through expert consultations. The project is expected to start in 2016. Read More »
Asian and African Scientists Learn How to Detect Animal Diseases Threatening Livestock Asian and African Scientists Learn How to Detect Animal Diseases Threatening Livestock. Animal diseases cause great damage in countries, especially where the majority of people depend on agriculture and livestock to live. After attending a two-week course organized this month by the IAEA, in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), several scientists from sub-Saharan Africa and Asia are now in the position to diagnose such diseases. Read More »
From Lab Coats to Hazmat Suits: IAEA Trains Scientists to Work Safely With Ebola From Lab Coats to Hazmat Suits: IAEA Trains Scientists to Work Safely With Ebola. The IAEA, in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO), is providing assistance to African Member States on the use of nuclear-derived techniques in identifying and characterizing quickly and effectively zoonotic diseases such as Ebola, Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and Rift Valley fever quickly and effectively.
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Nuclear-Derived Techniques Improve Cattle Productivity and Milk Quality in Cameroon. In collaboration with the IAEA and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), LAVANET and the country’s Institute of Agricultural Research for Development are engaged in training technicians on disease control and artificial insemination to improve cattle productivity and breeding management. Read More »
Improving vaccine efficiency to fight livestock diseases with new Flow-cytometer. Vaccines protect livestock against animal diseases and are crucial in disease control programs. Before novel vaccines are released to the market, they undergo a long and complex development, testing and approval process. A new state-of-the-art piece of equipment, a flow-cytometer, has been provided by the Government of Germany to the Animal Production and Health Laboratory in Seibersdorf. Read More »

Archived Highlights