Sterile Insect Technique, Insect Pest Control

Insect Pest Control

We assist FAO and IAEA Member States in the implementation of environmentally-friendly and sustainable methods to control major insect pests of crops and veterinary and human importance through strategic and applied research, technology transfer, capacity building, policy advice, information management, and technology transfer to field projects in Member States.

Our efforts focus on an area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) approach, with a sterile insect technique (SIT) component where feasible and required, to enhance food security, introduce sustainable agricultural systems, reduce losses and pesticide use, preserve biological diversity, and facilitate international trade in food and agricultural commodities by promoting the development and application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Standards. SIT does not involve transgenic (genetic engineering) processes.

Highlights
Nuclear Technique Helps Prevent Insects From Harming Your Coffee Beans Nuclear Technique Helps Prevent Insects From Harming Your Coffee Beans. Recent studies have shown that the Mediterranean fruit fly inflicts economic damage to coffee production by reducing weight of the coffee bean and affecting quality. The sterile insect technique integrated with other control methods is being used to control the pest protecting coffee production and industry. Watch Video En / Sp »
Nuclear Technique Helps Dominican Republic Eradicate Insect Pest That Hurt Agricultural Sector Nuclear Technique Helps Dominican Republic Eradicate Insect Pest That Hurt Agricultural Sector. The Dominican Republic today officially declared in a ceremony in the capital Santo Domingo that it has eradicated a major agricultural pest, the Mediterranean fruit fly, and that it is now free of the insect, two years after an outbreak led to considerable damage to its agricultural industry. The IAEA, in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and other stakeholders, provided assistance to the Dominican Republic to suppress the agricultural pest using the Sterile Insect Technique. Read More »
Prevention Rather Than Crisis Reaction Protects US Horticulture Industry from Medflies Prevention Rather Than Crisis Reaction Protects US Horticulture Industry from Medflies. One piece of fruit in a traveller’s backpack portends disaster if the fruit also contains hitchhiking larvae of the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly) – larvae that could escape inspection at port of entry and initiate an infestation. In the mid-1990s, California and Florida, the main USA horticulture-producing states, initiated area-wide preventive and continuous releases of sterile male medflies over high-risk areas – a pest control endeavour that has substantially reduced overall cost and prevented establishment of the pest. Read More »
Third FAO/IAEA International Conference on Area-wide Management of Insect Pests: Integrating the Sterile Insect and Related Nuclear and Other Techniques Third FAO/IAEA International Conference on Area-wide Management of Insect Pests: Integrating the Sterile Insect and Related Nuclear and Other Techniques. The Conference was held from 22 - 26 May 2017 at the Vienna International Centre, Vienna, Austria. The successful conference was attended by 360 delegates from 81 countries, six international organization, and nine exhibitors. See all presentations »
Stinging Wasps Replace Chemical Pesticides becoming Control Agents in Fighting Stable Flies Stinging Wasps Replace Chemical Pesticides becoming Control Agents in Fighting Stable Flies. Costa Rica’s position as the world’s largest producer of pineapple brings with it a parallel problem for the country’s livestock and dairy industry: the aggressive and blood-sucking stable fly, a fly that can wreak havoc on cattle and affect their productivity. In efforts to control the fly without resorting to chemical spraying, Costa Rica resorts to using a wasp, a natural enemy of the stable fly, as a biocontrol agent. Read More »
Fewer Flies, More Fruit in Jordan Valley Orchards Fewer Flies, More Fruit in Jordan Valley Orchards. In the Jordan Valley over 1.5 million sterilized flies are released twice a week in a selected area of 400 hectares of citrus and stone fruits, leading to medfly population suppression and effective protection of fruit production with no harm to the environment. Read More »
Area-wide Management of Insect Pests: Integrating the Sterile Insect and Related Nuclear and Other Techniques The Third FAO/IAEA International Conference on Area-wide Management of Insect Pests: Integrating the Sterile Insect and Related Nuclear and Other Techniques is taking place this week in Vienna, Austria, to discuss new developments, trends and challenges related to insect pest management. The conference is part of the efforts of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture to assist Member States address the rapidly evolving field of insect pest management. See video on area-wide insect pest management. View Video »
At the Mexico-Guatemala border, the sterile insect technique halts the northward march of medflies since 1982 At the Mexico-Guatemala border, the sterile insect technique halts the northward march of medflies since 1982. Imagine an area of nearly 200 000 km2 that needs to be monitored on a daily basis – monitored for the presence of a destructive insect smaller than a fingernail. More than four decades ago the governments of Mexico, Guatemala and the United States, and later also Belize, agreed to work together to eradicate and contain the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly through an effective area-wide integrated pest management technology involving the sterile insect technique. Read More »
International Database on Commodity Tolerance (IDCT) International Database on Commodity Tolerance (IDCT). A source of information that gathers and interprets the literature about commodity quality after phytosanitary irradiation treatment. It should aid stakeholders in Member States to identify the doses of radiation that are tolerated by different commodities including fresh fruits, vegetables and cut flowers in planning for commercial use of the technology. The information may also help users of the technology determine optimum methods of applying irradiation and scientists to identify gaps and inconsistencies in current knowledge. Read More »

Previous Highlights