Soil and Water Management & Crop Nutrition

Soil and Water Management & Crop Nutrition

The Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition (SWMCN) Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme and its associated SWMCN Laboratory assist FAO and IAEA Member States in the development, validation and dissemination of a range of soil, water and crop management technology packages through the use of nuclear and nuclear-related techniques.

The aims are:
→ To enhance agricultural productivity, ensure the conservation of soil and water resources for sustainable crop and livestock production systems and to improve farmers' livelihoods.
→ To improve soil quality and soil resilience against impacts of climate change and variability.
→ To reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase soil carbon sequestration in both productive and marginal lands.

To achieve these aims, we assist Member States through research and development (R&D), capacity building with a major emphasis on training the trainers, policy advice, technology transfer and technical support and assistance via Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) and Technical Cooperation Projects (TCPs).

Highlights
IAEA Impact: Viet Nam Tackles Soil Erosion With Nuclear Techniques IAEA Impact: Viet Nam Tackles Soil Erosion With Nuclear Techniques. Soil erosion is the main contributor to land degradation globally, leading to an annual loss of 75 billion tonnes of fertile soil, with an economic cost of about US $126 billion per year. The IAEA, in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), helps scientists and farmers in measuring and controlling soil erosion through the use of various nuclear techniques. Read More »
Working for Better Soil on Earth: IAEA Celebrates Global Soil Week and the International Year of Soil Working for Better Soil on Earth: IAEA Celebrates Global Soil Week and the International Year of Soil. The international community is coming together today for Global Soil Week to emphasize the importance of land and soil and the role it plays in achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. This week, the IAEA is highlighting its work supporting Member States to address land and soil issues and is supporting the designation of 2015 as the United Nations International Year of Soil. Read More »
IAEA Impact: More Bountiful Crops With Every Drop Using Drip Irrigation in Mauritius IAEA Impact: More Bountiful Crops With Every Drop Using Drip Irrigation in Mauritius. Cauliflower, broccoli, sweet pepper and many other nutritious vegetables used to be expensive in Mauritius. The island's climate and traditional agricultural practices were not suitable for cultivating several high value vegetable crops, while importing them to the island state was prohibitively costly due to the long distances involved. This has all changed over the past few years, and local farms are now starting to supply the country's growing population and burgeoning tourism industry with fresh, locally grown produce. Read More »
Rice production - what Cuba can teach the world Rice production - what Cuba can teach the world. Cuba’s annual rice consumption is estimated as high as 60 kilograms per capita, meaning each person in the country eats more than a kilo of rice a week. To meet this demand, Cuba dedicates some 200 000 hectares (ha) of land to rice production, but, until recently, due to soil infertility and the high cost of chemical fertilizers, the yields were low and more than 55 per cent of the rice consumed was imported. Read More »

Previous Highlights