Training

Training, Soil and Water Management & Crop NutritionThe Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Subprogramme of the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture plays an important role in the training of technical staff and scientists from Member States in the use and application of nuclear and related techniques and in the analyses of stable isotopes. Training is carried out in the Soil and Water management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory at the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, Seibersdorf. Training comes in individual or group fellowships, scientific visits, national, regional or interregional training courses, workshops or meetings.

Training, Soil and Water Management & Crop NutritionA range of topics relating to soil and water management and crop nutrition are being covered. They include the use of fallout radionuclides to assess erosion and sedimentation processes; field estimation of soil water content, water balance and water use efficiency using different soil water monitoring equipment; use of isotopes of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen to evaluate crop tolerance to drought and salinity; determine biological nitrogen fixation, improve fertilizer management, assess soil organic carbon dynamics and separate soil evaporation from evapotranspiration etc.

Application forms for fellowships, scientific visits, and nominations for training courses, can be obtained at http://www-tc.iaea.org/tcweb/default.asp.

Training courses conducted in 2013

Training, Soil and Water Management & Crop Nutrition

  • - Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics and Management: The use of innovative isotope and conventional techniques,
    15 April - 10 May 2013, Seibersdorf, Austria.
  • - Agricultural water management: The use of innovative isotope and conventional techniques, 24 June - 2 August 2013, Seibersdorf, Austria.
  • - Hands-on Training on The Use of Isotopic Techniques in Soil and Water Management & Crop Nutrition, 7 October - 5 November 2013, Seibersdorf, Austria.

List of fellows, scientific visitors at the SWMCN Laboratory in 2012.